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Watson Cam
Dr Watson reviews his tab at the Hound and Ferret

Dr Watson reviews his tab at the Hound and Ferret

A Patient Audience

Upon the special request of Inspector Lestrade I went undercover as a surgeon at Charing Cross Hospital in what later became known as the Mystery of the Diffident Nurse.  So successful was my deception that one day while searching for the gentleman’s toilet (undercover work always goes straight to my bladder) I opened a door and found myself  in front of a large gallery of medical students who applauded most generously.

Upon the special request of Inspector Lestrade I took the identity of a surgeon at Charing Cross Hospital in what later became known as the Mystery of the Diffident Nurse.

I was most taken aback but not as much as when I was asked to perform an appendectomy on a man who was suddenly wheeled before me.  My General Practice had not prepared me for this moment – my only previous surgical experience being the removal of small moles.

Nonetheless I couldn’t disappoint my audience and dived in enthusiastically, confident I would pick it up as I went along. At the end of the case we all had a jolly good laugh about it and fifteen years on I still occasionally lunch with my unwitting patient, although this is sometimes a bit strained since he is now strictly limited to non-solids and can only lie out flat.

Skeleton Staff

Doctors from Charing Cross Hospital describe what will happen to me if they ever see me again

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